Jess Free(dom)

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(Source: oceanechild)

august-mor:

Jane Goodall. National Geographic, 1974.
“You cannot get through a single day without having an impact on the world around you. What you do makes a difference, and you have to decide what kind of difference you want to make.” 

august-mor:

Jane GoodallNational Geographic, 1974.

“You cannot get through a single day without having an impact on the world around you. What you do makes a difference, and you have to decide what kind of difference you want to make.” 

(via we-all-share-one-moon)

visitheworld:

A river runs through it, Shirakawa-gō / Japan (by GluehweinEffects).

visitheworld:

A river runs through it, Shirakawa-gō / Japan (by GluehweinEffects).

(via wild-nirvana)

Conflict resolution for children

Conflict Resolution for Kids

Printable  Copy

Step 1:  Remove item from EVERYBODY involved.  (This is a really, really important step in conflict resolution.) If the item is  big, like a swing or bike then everyone should be scooted away from it.   Kids tend to feel ownership over anything they are physically  touching.

Step 2:  Identify the Problem.  You’ll  want to help the kids break down the problem into  simple terms and  hit the root of the problem.   You can do this by simply ignoring  emotional arguments and asking direct questions.  “Who wants  this shovel?  Oh, I see.  You want this shovel.  Does anyone else  want this shovel?  Ah, she wants the shovel too.  So the problem is  that you want this shovel and she wants this shovel.  Is that the  problem?” Once the first kid agrees, clear it with the second kid.   ”Is the problem that you want this shovel and he wants this  shovel?”

Step 3:  Find a solution.  As adults we  are really quick to jump in with solutions to our kids’ problems…I mean we are  older and wiser.  If you give this a try, use patience (and of course bite  your tongue) I promise you will be so impressed with  the brilliant solutions young kids can come up with.  All they  need is a little guidance and some time to think.   “Now that we know  what the problem is, all we have to do is find a solution.”  Direct  your question to one kid first.  “What solution can you think of for  this problem?”

Step 4:  Repeat the solution.  It doesn’t  matter what your kid says, it’s a solution.  Might not be a working  solution, but it is an idea that should be respected.  “Oh, okay.   Your solution is that you play with the shovel all day and he digs with  his hands.”  Once she confirms that is what she suggested turn to the  other kid.  ”She suggested that she will use the shovel all day and you  can dig with your hands…does that work for you?”

Step 5:  Another solution.  Because the  two children are working together to solve a problem they always have the right  to refuse a solution.  It needs to be done respectfully.  ”No,  that idea does not work for me.”  You will  then acknowledge their right to decline the offer, and ask  them to offer up their own ideas. “That idea doesn’t work for you.   What solution can you think of?”

***Important note.  This part of the process  can go on for a long time, but the outcome is worth the effort.  If you  come to a stand off and solutions are not coming, simply take a break.   ”I’ll tell you what, I have to go over here for a bit, you to keep  thinking.  When you have a solution that works for both of you I would love  to hear it.”  MAKE SURE TO  TAKE THE ITEM WITH YOU!***

Step 6: The solution.  Eventually one of two  things will happen; one kid will decide they don’t care that much about the  item, or one kid will come up with a solution that brings an instant smile to  their face.  (They realize they’re brilliant!)  Once the other kid  agrees all that’s left is the confirmation.

Step 7:  Repeat the problem and solution…just  to make sure everyone understands.  “So the problem was that he wanted  the shovel and she wanted the shovel.  The solution that you both agree on  is that he will play with the shovel until his hole is done and then he will  bring it over to you.  Is that correct?”

The beauty of conflict resolution is that since the  kids came up with the solution they are far more likely to stick to  it.  You should still pay attention and make sure both kids are sticking to  the agreement but 9.5 times out of 10 everyone will walk away happy.   (Lucky, Lucky Mommy!)

Read more at http://amomwithalessonplan.com/mommy-fun-fact-11-conflict-resolution/#sY41WsTeQt0RZ1OO.99

(via themoonphase)

ZINEEEEE BLeep

**BROOKLYN ZINE FEST** Brooklyn Zine Fest 2014 on April 26th & 27th 11-6 at Brooklyn Historical Society, 128 Pierrepont Street in Brooklyn Heights. Free to attend, all ages,and open to everyone. See brooklynzinefest.com

If you don’t go after what you want, you’ll never have it. If you don’t ask, the answer is always no. If you don’t step forward, you’re always in the same place.

Nora Roberts (via observando)

(via shes-handsome)

The magic begins in you. Feel your own energy, and realize similar energy exists within the Earth, stones, plants, water, wind, fire, colores, and animals.

Scott Cunningham (via dehanginggarden)

(via you-are-the-universe)